Glasses Carafes Plates Bowls Vases Containers Lighting Ashtrays

MARIE-ROSE KAHANE

YALI Murano Glass was founded in 2008 by Marie-Rose Kahane when she relocated to Venice with her family in the same year. Marie-Rose's bond with Murano glass was forged in her youth, when she began collecting it on her regular visits to Venice. The creation of YALI Murano Glass many years later happened organically.
Yali Murano glass design - Marie-Rose Kahane

BACKGROUND AND EDUCATION

"At university, I studied Art History and Psychology as a double major. I began my studies in Jerusalem and then completed my degree in Paris. After university I worked designing costumes for the theatre, which was great fun. Simultaneously I opened a small fashion boutique in central Jerusalem with a friend. We both loved fabrics and colours and our clothes soon became very popular. Our style was very organic. The clothes were simple yet sophisticated and very easy to wear, with beautiful buttons and detailing."

ON PSYCHOLOGY

"Although I completed a degree in psychology, I have never worked as a psychologist, yet it has always stayed with me. It affects everything I do. I am more aware and more patient with myself. In life, it really helps to know oneself and to be conscious of the fact things are constantly changing, and to be accepting of that."



I acquire my inspiration from various places; from travelling, nature, art, music and sounds. I'm curious about everything and everyone; objects, people, cultures, colours and places.

Yali murano glass - pink vase

ON INSPIRATION

"I acquire my inspiration from various places; from travelling, nature, art, music and sounds. I'm curious about everything and everyone; objects, people, cultures, colours and places. In the last few years I have used photography to capture snapshots of my everyday inspiration. Another great passion of mine is the cinema. I love to sit in a dark room and watch the magic unfold on screen. I actually think that everything in my life becomes an inspiration. I use everything. Nothing is really wasted, but we must take care of it all."

Yali murano glass - glass design Venice
Yali murano glass - glass design Venice
Yali murano glass - glass design Venice

I don't see myself as an artist. I consider myself more of a 'maker' or a 'fabricator'

ON WORKING

"I don't see myself as an artist. I consider myself more of a 'maker' or a 'fabricator'. I like the idea that you begin with something in your head and then you see it in 3D form. I've always loved to make things. I like to create objects that I can use. For example, if I have wool, I will knit a scarf, if I have fabric, I will make a dress. There is no end to my desire to create. There are always new things I want to do. My mind is often restless with new ideas to explore and one project inevitably leads on to another. I am fascinated as to why we create, why we make things. I find this aspect of human nature very interesting and I enjoy exploring how we are all linked in this way. In the grand scheme of things, we are all linked...everything is linked. Living in Venice, I am very much aware of how precious the role of the artisan is. Fortunately many people still work with their hands here and over the years I have had the great pleasure of collaborating with many of them."

I am very much aware of how precious the role of the artisan is.

Yali murano glass - working with glass

ON GLASS

"Glass comes in many forms, be it reflective, colourful, protective, transparent or opaque. It can be in the form of a container or a sheet of glass. It is resistant yet fragile...very much like people. I began really looking at Murano glass about 20 years ago - especially the work of Venini. I developed a real appreciation - not so much for the function of the glass - but for the beautiful shapes and harmonious proportions. When I moved to Venice in 2009 glass became the obvious medium by which to express my creativity and Murano was the obvious place to produce the work. I began designing simple glasses that we would use at home. Gradually I started experimenting with forms and colours until I had developed my first small collection. The collaboration process between designer and glassblower is very important. If the rapport is good, the results can be magical. I was lucky to have had this with maestro, Roberto Finotto, in these early years. Through him I was able to realise much of what was once just an idea in my head."